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Journal of Education for Business

ISSN: 0883-2323 (Print) 1940-3356 (Online) Journal homepage: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/vjeb20

The Relationship of HR Professionals' Online

Experiences With Perceptions of Organizational

Hiring and Promotion of Online Graduates

Gundars Egons Kaupins, James Edward Wanek & Malcolm Paulin Coco

To cite this article: Gundars Egons Kaupins, James Edward Wanek & Malcolm Paulin Coco (2014) The Relationship of HR Professionals' Online Experiences With Perceptions of

Organizational Hiring and Promotion of Online Graduates, Journal of Education for Business, 89:5, 222-229, DOI: 10.1080/08832323.2013.852076

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The Relationship of HR Professionals’ Online

Experiences With Perceptions of Organizational

Hiring and Promotion of Online Graduates

Gundars Egons Kaupins and James Edward Wanek

Boise State University, Boise, Idaho, USA

Malcolm Paulin Coco

Abilene Christian University, Abilene, Texas, USA

Based on a survey of 264 human resources professionals from 10 Society for Human Resource Management chapters in Texas, the authors investigated how human resources professionals accept online degrees compared to degrees based on face-to-face coursework for hiring and promotion purposes. If respondents were satisfied with their own online course experiences, they were most likely to view their organization as treating an online bachelor’s or master’s degree as equivalent to a traditional degree for hiring or promotion purposes. Having had online courses in the past or having completed an online degree had no similar and significant association with perceptions of online program equivalency.

Keywords: hiring, online education, promotions, quality, traditional education

The employability and promotion of individuals who grad-uate from online degree programs are a major employer concern. Though employers appreciate the flexible schedul-ing and reduced travel expense of online degree programs (Gagne & Shepherd, 2001), some employer criticisms include social isolation risk, academic dishonesty, informa-tion overload, and poor instrucinforma-tional quality (Sapp & Simon, 2005; Waschull, 2011). Some academician criticisms involve the social isolation risk, increased poten-tial for academic dishonesty, potenpoten-tial for information over-load, limited computer access in some areas, inadequate computer equipment (Sapp & Simon, 2005; Waschull, 2001), use of false identities, loss of anonymity, and loss of confidentiality in online learning (Agger-Gupta, 2010).

While there is considerable survey data on employer hir-ing acceptability of individuals who take online classes or graduate from online degree programs (e.g., Adams, DeFleur, & Heald, 2007; Bailey & Flegle, 2012; Guendoo, 2008; Hartman, 2007; Means, Toyama, Murphy, Bakia, & Jones, 2010; Society for Human Resource Management, 2010), there is scant research on the promotability of such

individuals. Survey data on employer hiring acceptability mostly focuses on whether employers would hire someone from an online program and shares some reasons why. Research on employer and organizational characteristics affecting perceptions of online student hiring and promo-tion acceptability is lacking.

PURPOSE

Just like prior research, in this study we ask, do employers view online programs as equivalent to face-to-face pro-grams in terms of hiring? But unlike prior research, we ask, do employers view online programs as equivalent to face-to-face programs in terms of promotion decisions? In the present study we also build on these hiring and promotion results by examining key demographic and organizational factors that may affect employer perceptions associated with online programs.

LITERATURE REVIEW

Online degrees have increasingly gained employer accep-tance. A survey of Chief Learning Officers and Directors of

Correspondence should be addressed to Gundars Egons Kaupins, Boise State University, 313 Department of Management, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725, USA. E-mail: gkaupins@boisestate.edu

ISSN: 0883-2323 print / 1940-3356 online DOI: 10.1080/08832323.2013.852076

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Human Resources found that more than 62% had a favor-able attitude toward online instruction and view online learning as the same or greater than regular classroom instruction (Hartman, 2007). Interviews with Wisconsin hiring managers found that half believed online master of business administration (MBA) degrees were as valuable as campus-based MBA degrees (Bailey & Flegle, 2012). Guendoo (2008) found that community college administra-tors were more willing to hire individuals who received their doctoral degrees online than administrators from tradi-tional four-year degree universities.

The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) surveyed 449 human resources professionals and found that if job applicants had identical job experiences and educa-tion, 39% responded that there was no difference between an online or traditional degree. About 41% responded with a preference for individuals who took both a bachelor’s and a master’s at a traditional program (SHRM, 2010). An ear-lier SHRM (2009) survey of 570 human resources manag-ers found that 47% either agreed or strongly agreed that online university programs are equally credible to tradi-tional degree programs.

A one-on-one comparison between traditional and online preferences yields different results. In a national survey of 159 health care administrators, 95% of respondents would hire someone from a traditional degree program rather than an online program when given the choice (Adams et al., 2007). In a study of 270 small and medium-size companies, 96% of managers said they would select traditional job can-didates over those with online degrees and 75% would select traditional over those with hybrid degrees (Adams & DeFleur, 2006).

A survey of certified public accounting recruiters did not perceive a difference between a candidate who received an online master of accounting degree versus a traditional accounting degree (Metrejean & Noland, 2011). In contrast, Kohlmeyer, Seese, and Sincich (2011) found that there was a strong preference among recruiters to hire students who completed face-to-face programs. Reasons for the bias against online programs include the lack of interpersonal experiences, weak reputation and quality of online pro-grams, professors did not know their online students, lack of rigor, and lack of familiarity with online instruction.

Familiarity bias is the theory that alternatives that are more familiar are perceived to be better than those that are not. Prior research in finance has shown a strong familiarity bias for local and known investments and stocks (Fox & Levav, 2000; Huberman, 2001). Such bias often leads to unwise investment decisions (BizEd, 2012). Prior research in marketing has shown a mixed message for familiarity bias. Prior positive experiences can narrow preferences for certain types of brands (Krug & Weaver, 2005; Tam, 2008), housing (Seiler, Traub, & Harrison, 2008), online companies (Kyun, 2005), and research journals (Levin & Kratochwill, 1976). However, negative experiences can be

devastating due to the need for actual performance (Brooks & Highhouse, 2006; Diss, 2007; Higgins, Echterhoff, Cres-pillo, & Kopietz, 2007). In the context of the present research, Kohlmeyer et al. (2011) suggested that the lack of familiarity with online instruction was associated with a lower impression of online accountancy programs com-pared to traditional programs.

In general, the literature shows that online degrees are showing increasing acceptability in terms of hiring. How-ever, they are not as acceptable yet as traditional degree programs.

HYPOTHESES

The literature is missing several dimensions of acceptabil-ity. While there is considerable literature comparing online to traditional graduates concerning hiring, there is scant research on promotions of graduates of online programs compared to graduates of traditional programs.

The literature is also missing more detailed analysis of respondent characteristics. For example, the comprehensive SHRM (2009, 2010) surveys reported basic online educa-tion opinions of human resources managers but did not go into any depth concerning the demographic characteristics of the human resources managers and the effects these demographic characteristics have on the results. Sample demographic characteristics include whether respondents have taken online courses, have graduated from the online courses, and were satisfied with the online courses.

The literature concerning familiarity bias suggests that familiarity with an experience, particularly with a positive one, would lead to higher future opinions of that experi-ence. Kohlmeyer et al. (2011) suggested that the lack of online familiarity with online accountancy programs was associated with lower impressions of online accountancy programs. We extend the familiarity bias to individuals who have prior experience with online classes, have per-sonal satisfaction with them, or have graduated from online programs. Their familiarity bias may positively affect how they view their organization’s impression of online classes relative to traditional classes. In that light, we created six hypotheses that link some type of online experience with perceptions of organizational hiring and promotions:

Hypothesis 1 (H1): Prior Experience: A person’s prior experience with an online degree program would be associated with the person perceiving his or her organi-zation to treat an online degree as equivalent to a tradi-tional college or university program when making (a) a hiring decision or (b) a promotion decision.

H2: Personal Satisfaction: A person’s satisfaction with online degree classes would be associated with per-ceiving his or her organization to treat an online degree

ONLINE DEGREE ACCEPTANCE 223

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as being equivalent to a traditional college or univer-sity degree program when making (a) a hiring decision or (b) a promotion decision.

H3: Graduation: A person’s graduation from an online degree program would be associated with perceiving his or her organization to treat an online degree as being equivalent to a traditional college or university program when making (a) a hiring decision or (b) a promotion decision.

These hypotheses are important to help expand the research concerning online education because it shows what effect prior experience with online education has on perceptions of organization policies associated with online programs. It also shows how online education is perceived in the context of hiring and promotion decisions.

METHODOLOGY

Data Collection

Human resources managers, specialists, consultants, and other human resources professionals were the target sam-ple. These professionals tend to have significant knowledge of organizational policies associated with hiring and pro-motions (Dessler, 2014).

To obtain the target sample, one coauthor, Malcolm Paulin Coco, attended 10 SHRM monthly meetings and asked attendees to complete a two-page questionnaire cov-ering the key issues associated with the hypotheses. At these meetings, 264 respondents completed the survey between February and April of 2012.

Questionnaires were distributed in San Antonio, Grand Prairie, Fort Worth, Lubbock, Brownwood, New Braunfels, Abilene, Wichita Falls, Amarillo, and Stephenville, Texas. The chapters were from large cities such as San Antonio (pop-ulation 1,327,407) and Fort Worth (1,197,816), and smaller towns such as Brownwood (19,288) and Stephenville (17,123; Texas State Library and Archives Commission, 2010).

Sample

As shown in Table 1, most respondents are human resour-ces managers and are involved in hiring. About two thirds work in companies that have 500 or fewer employees. Almost half are with companies that are in multiple locations.

Variables

In the questionnaire, one key dependent variable was mea-sured as a dummy where it was coded 1 for responses in which online bachelor degrees are treated as equivalent to a similar degree from a traditional college or university and 0

otherwise. Another dependent variable was coded 1 for responses in which online master’s degrees are treated as equivalent to a similar degree from a traditional college or university and 0 otherwise. A final dependent variable was coded 1 for responses in which promoting individuals with online degrees are treated as equivalent to a similar degree from a traditional college or university and 0 otherwise. Also in the questionnaire, three key independent variables were as follows:

TABLE 1

Demographic Characteristics

Demographic % n

Have taken courses online

Yes 46.2 121

No 53.8 141

No response 2

Satisfied with online classes compared to traditional classes

Very satisfied 39.7 48

Satisfied 38.8 47

Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied 15.7 19

Dissatisfied 5.8 7

Very dissatisfied 0.0 0

No response/have not taken online classes 143 Have completed an online degree

Yes 5.4 14

No 93.6 248

No response 2

Make hiring decisions for your organization

Yes 71.9 187

No 28.1 73

No response 4

Number of employees at your business location

1–100 employees 30.4 79

101–500 employees 36.9 96

501–1000 employees 11.1 29

1001–2000 employees 9.6 25

2001Cemployees 11.9 31

No response 4

Approximate business structure

Single location 35.5 93

Multiple locations 46.2 121 Division of a national entity 17.9 47

Other 1.1 3

Job title

Human resources manager/director/vice president 46.3 125 Human resources specialist 21.5 58

Other 30.6 81

SHRM chapter location

San Antonio 19.3 51

Grand Prairie 7.2 19

Fort Worth 15.2 40

Lubbock 9.8 26

Brownwood 3.0 8

New Braunfels 5.7 15

Abilene 12.5 33

Wichita Falls 12.1 32

Amarillo 10.2 27

Stephenville 4.9 13

Note:SHRMDSociety for Human Resource Management.

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1. Have you taken any online courses? Yes (coded as 1) or no (coded as 0).

2. If you said yes to the previous question, how satisfied were you with your online classes compared to tradi-tional classes? Very satisfied (coded as 5), satisfied (4), neither satisfied nor dissatisfied (3), dissatisfied (2), or very dissatisfied (1).

3. Have you completed an online degree? Yes (coded as 1) or no (coded as 0).

RESULTS

Results from Table 2 show that about 51% of respondents believe that when making a hiring decision that requires a degree, their organization treats an online bachelor’s degree as equivalent to a similar degree from a traditional college or university. About 15% stated it has a lesser value and about 28% provided a conditional response of acceptability dependent upon the job opening. The results for the hiring decisions related to the online master’s degree appeared similar to the results for the online bachelor’s degree involving whether the master’s degree was equivalent or of lesser value to a traditional program and whether a master’s degree was acceptable dependent on the job opening.

When making promotion decisions, about 69% of respondents believe that their organization treats an online degree as equivalent to a similar degree from a traditional

college or university. Only about 11% viewed the online degree of lesser value.

When making a one-on-one contrast between online degrees and traditional college programs, the results show major differences in perceptions. When asked if an online degree would be considered equivalent to a face-to-face degree from a traditional college or university, only about 13% of respondents agreed that there would be equivalence if the online degree were earned less than three years ago. The percentage jumps to about 53% if there is significant work experience, 33% if there are hard-to-find skills, and 42% if there are other relevant licenses or professional credentials.

Table 3 shows correlation results between key questions in the survey from Table 2 and various demographic ques-tions from Table 1. The most significant results were the strong positive association between respondent satisfaction with online classes they have taken and their perception of how their organization views an online degree as equivalent to traditional degrees. The correlations were significant (p<.01) for bachelor’s degree hiring decisions (rD.363) and master’s degree hiring decisions (rD.344). In Table 4, the correlation between respondent satisfaction with online classes they have taken and their perception of how their organization makes promotion decisions (r D .282) also was significant (p<.01).

The prior experience hypotheses (1a and 1b) were not supported. A person’s prior experience with an online degree program was not associated with the person

TABLE 2

Use of College Degrees in Hiring and Promotion Decisions

Question % n

When making a hiring decision that requires a degree, my organization treats an online bachelor’s degree. . .

as equivalent to a similar degree from a traditional college or university 50.8 134 as of lesser value than a similar degree from a traditional college or university 15.1 40

as acceptable but it depends on the job opening 28.0 74

as insufficient to meet hiring standards 1.5 4

don’t know/no response 10.2 27

When making a hiring decision that requires a degree, my organization treats an online master’s degree. . .

as equivalent to a similar degree from a traditional college or university 50.4 133

as acceptable but it depends on the job opening 23.5 62

as of lesser value than a similar degree from a traditional college or university 15.5 41 as equivalent but only if the person’s undergraduate degree is from a traditional college or university 4.2 11

as insufficient to meet promotion qualifications 0.8 2

don’t know/no response 12.1 32

When making a promotion decision that requires a degree, my organization treats an online degree. . .

as equivalent to a similar degree from a traditional college or university 69.3 183 as of lesser value than a similar degree from a traditional college or university 11.3 30

as insufficient to meet promotion qualifications 1.1 3

don’t know/no response 15.5 41

In my organization, an online degree would be considered equivalent to a degree from a traditional college or university if the candidate. . .

earned the online degree less than three years ago 12.9 34

has significant work experience 52.7 139

has hard-to-find skills 32.9 87

has other relevant licenses or professional credentials (e.g., PHR, CPA) 42.4 112

Note:Percentages are based on 264 sample size; multiple responses are possible.

ONLINE DEGREE ACCEPTANCE 225

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perceiving his or her organization to treat an online degree as equivalent to a traditional college or university program when making a hiring or promotion decision. Table 3 shows no significant correlations between having taken an online course and any hiring decision variables for bach-elor’s degrees or master’s degrees. Table 4 shows no signif-icant correlations between having taken an online course and the two promotion decision variables.

The personal satisfaction hypotheses (2a and 2b) were supported for hiring and promotions. In other words, a per-son’s satisfaction with online degree classes was associated with perceiving his or her organization to treat an online degree as being equivalent to a traditional college or univer-sity degree program when making a hiring and promotion decision. Table 3 shows significant correlations (p <. 01) between being satisfied with online courses and viewing the bachelor’s degree as equivalent (rD.363), lesser (rD –.225), and acceptable (r D –.217). Two of the three

correlations are significant (p <.01) between viewing the master’s degree as equivalent (rD.344), lesser (rD–.344), and acceptable (r D –.014). The latter is not significant. Table 4 shows significant correlations (p <.01) between being satisfied with online courses and whether online degrees are treated as equivalent for promotion decisions (rD.282) and lesser (rD–.286).

The graduation hypotheses (3a and 3b) were not sup-ported. In other words, a person’s graduation from an online degree program was not associated with perceiving his or her organization to treat an online degree as being equiva-lent to a traditional college or university program when making a hiring or promotion decision. The tables showed no significant correlations between having completed an online degree and any hiring (Table 3) or promotion (Table 4) decisions.

Variables such as make hiring decisions for your organi-zation, work in a single location, work in multiple

TABLE 3

Correlation Results for Hiring Decisions

Hiring

When making a hiring decision that requires a degree, my organization treats an online bachelor’s degree as. . .to a similar degree from a traditional

college or university.

Equivalent ¡.095 .363** .097 .042 .042 ¡.002 .019 ¡.040 Lesser ¡.072 ¡.225** ¡.054 .003 ¡.050 .013 ¡.087 .015 Acceptable .042 ¡.217** ¡.073 .197** .000 ¡.027 ¡.002 .214**

When making a hiring decision that requires a degree, my organization treats an online master’s degree as. . .to a similar degree from a traditional college

or university.

Correlation Results for Promotion Decisions

Promotion

When making a promotion decision that requires a degree, my organization treats an online degree as. . .to a similar degree from a traditional

college or university.

Equivalent ¡.013 .282** .113 .221 ¡.006 .108 .014 .250** Lesser .045 ¡.286** ¡.087 .089 ¡.080 .062 .003 ¡.032

In my organization, an online degree would be considered equivalent to a degree from a traditional college or university if the candidate. . .

Has online degree<3 years .037 .162* .074 .122 .016 ¡.004 ¡.112 .044 Has significant work experience .186* .077 ¡.011 .210** ¡.122 .096 .066 .141* Has hard-to-find skills ¡.002 .015 ¡.167* ¡.014 .001 ¡.038 .006 ¡.105 Has other credentials .078 .003 .008 ¡.254** .113 .018 ¡.140 ¡.263**

*p<.05. **p<.01.

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locations, and work as a human resources manager or direc-tor were not significantly related to the hiring or promotion decision variables.

Table 5 regression results further support results from correlations. Nine regressions are shown in which the dependent variables in each case was the organization treat-ing the online degree as equivalent to a face-to-face pro-gram in terms of (a) bachelor’s propro-grams for hiring, (b) master’s programs for hiring, and (c) general online degree programs for promotion purposes. The independent varia-bles include the three main variavaria-bles associated with the hypotheses (personal experience with online classes, per-sonal satisfaction with online classes, and graduation from online programs). Included are demographic-related varia-bles such as “Do you make hiring decisions for the organ-ization?” “Do you work in a single location?” “What are the number of people at your location?” and “Are you an HR manager or director?” The personal experience with online classes was removed from the regression equation. The results show that each of the regression equations including the personal satisfaction with online classes able were significantly associated with the dependent vari-able. Also, being a human resources manager or director was positively associated with viewing the online degree as equivalent to a face-to-face degree for promotion purposes.

DISCUSSION

Based on the literature review and the survey results, online education is not perceived as equivalent to traditional edu-cation in colleges and universities. Only about half of the respondents in the human resources field believed that their organizations treat online graduates as equivalent to tradi-tional program graduates for hiring purposes.

The unique contribution of this study concerns the result that if respondents were satisfied with their own online course experience, they were most likely to view their orga-nization as treating an online degree as equivalent to a tra-ditional degree for hiring or promotion purposes. Having had online courses in the past or having completed an

TABLE 5 Nine Regression Results

Independent variable Beta t Significance

Dependent variable: Online bachelor’s degree is equivalent to a face-to-face degree for hiring decisions purposes.

Took online ¡.090 ¡1.422 .156 Single location .049 .734 .463 # Employees .011 .454 .650 Hiring decisions .056 .735 .463

HRMgr ¡.045 ¡.649 .517

R2D.014;FD0.724; Sig.D.606

Satisfied w/online .199 4.002 .001 Single location .132 1.384 .169 # Employees ¡.032 ¡.900 .370 Hiring decisions .062 .590 .557

HRMgr ¡.040 ¡.404 .687

R2D.170;FD4.638; Sig.D.001

Online degree .228 1.624 .102 Single location .039 .576 .565 # Employees .012 .484 .629 Hiring decisions .065 .862 .389

HRMgr ¡.063 ¡.908 .365

R2D.017;FD0.860; Sig.D.509

Dependent variable: Online master’s degree is equivalent to a face-to-face degree for hiring decisions purposes.

Took online ¡.075 ¡1.200 .231 Single location ¡.034 ¡.502 .616 # Employees .034 1.425 .155 Hiring decisions .089 1.176 .241

HRMgr ¡.006 ¡.083 .934

R2D.023;FD1.157; Sig.D.331

Satisfied w/ online .194 3.871 .001 Single location .157 1.633 .105 # Employees ¡.024 ¡.667 .506 Hiring decisions .092 .871 .386

HRMgr ¡.001 ¡.007 .995

R2D.164;FD4.447; Sig.D.001

Online degree .233 1.688 .093 Single location ¡.045 ¡.665 .507 # Employees .035 1.465 .144 Hiring decisions .097 1.290 .198

HRMgr ¡.023 ¡.339 .735

R2D.028;FD1.444; Sig.D.209

Dependent variable: Online master’s degree is equivalent to a face-to-face degree for promotion purposes.

Took online ¡.013 ¡.225 .822 Single location .013 .226 .822 # Employees .006 .266 .790 Hiring decisions .142 2.135 .034

HRMgr .180 2.967 .003

R2D.082;FD4.334; Sig.D.001

Satisfied w/online .168 3.680 .001 Single location .007 .080 .936 # Employees ¡.064 ¡1.994 .049 Hiring decisions .134 1.425 .157

HRMgr .197 3.680 .028

R2D.209;FD5.724; Sig.D.001

Online degree .172 1.428 .155 Single location .007 .112 .911

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TABLE 5

Nine Regression Results(Continued)

Independent variable Beta t Significance

# Employees .006 .299 .765 Hiring decisions .144 2.182 .030

HRMgr .170 2.805 .005

R2D.089;FD4.767; Sig.D.001

Note:Took onlineD Have you taken any online courses? Satisfied

w/ onlineDAre you satisfied with online classes? Online degreeDHave you completed an online degree? Single locationDWork in a single loca-tion? # Employees D Number of employees at your location. Hiring decisionsDDo you make hiring decisions for your organization? HRMgr

DAre you an HR manager or director?

ONLINE DEGREE ACCEPTANCE 227

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online degree had no similar or significant association with respondent perceptions of online program equivalency.

There are several interpretations of the result focusing on the influence of satisfaction with the online environment. Simple familiarity with online classes may not be a major factor influencing survey responses. It is possible that bad personal experiences with the online environment may neg-atively cloud respondent perceptions so respondents per-ceive their organizations as being negative toward online programs. It is possible that bad personal experiences with the online environment may allow respondents to person-ally influence the hiring practices of their companies. This can be done through direct leadership roles as human resources managers or directors (most of the respondents had these roles) or through indirect influence by convincing those who have influence such as human resources manag-ers and hiring directors that online programs are not worth much.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTITIONERS

Survey results show that there is a near even split between human resources practitioners on whether online degrees are equivalent to face-to-face degrees. Individuals with online degrees are still facing a perceptual uphill battle when it comes to hiring and promotion decisions in companies.

A major factor that may influence hiring and promotion decisions is whether human resources practitioners have had satisfaction with their online education. If a company hired human resources managers who have had poor expe-riences with their online education, it appears likely that these individuals would perceive their organizations as not promoting many individuals who have had online degrees.

FUTURE RESEARCH

Hiring and promotions are basic human resources–related decisions made by organizations that are partly based on information about the candidate’s educational background. These are by far not the only decisions. Whether an employee has participated in online or traditional education can affect many other human resources–related decisions including the initial pay and benefits, potential raises, employee discipline, selection for future training programs, and performance appraisals.

Future researchers need to analyze different types of online programs in more detail. They can look at what respondents think about specific online programs (e.g., Uni-versity of Phoenix) compared to various online programs offered by traditional universities. According to Webley (2012), perhaps a significant reason why people might not get a job from an online degree program is they got the

degree from a for-profit entity rather than a degree using the online medium. The entity is more important than the medium. Prestigious universities sponsoring massive open online courses, or MOOCs, such as Harvard, Stanford, and Princeton may increase the interest of students by employ-ers who complete those courses. Hybrid course programs that combine online and face-to-face elements taught by traditional universities also need to be investigated for their acceptability.

Future researchers also should look at other respondent characteristics that can moderate their perceptions of orga-nizational practices associated with online education. Some demographics including gender, age, race, and national ori-gin were not collected in the present study. Other character-istics include the motivation of respondents taking online classes. It is possible that those taking online classes due to necessity due to money or scheduling reasons may have a higher respect for online programs. Those taking online classes just for fun may not have much respect for the classes.

CONCLUSION

The most significant result of the study was that if respond-ents were satisfied with their online coursework, they were more likely to perceive their organization as treating an online bachelor’s or master’s degree as equivalent to a tra-ditional degree for hiring or promotion purposes. As many respondents are in hiring positions, such familiarity bias could have a significant impact on who gets hired and even-tually promoted in the organizations. Prior familiarity with online classes by taking courses or graduating from an online program had no significant impact on respondent perceptions of organizational views of online versus tradi-tional programs. The bottom line is whether the respondent had good online experiences.

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References

Related subjects : most-likely