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  Here, you find information about what you need to know to start drawing from a list of drawing supplies to use to different ways to find inspiration to asummary of the steps you go through to make a drawing. And because it’s the digital age, you find a whole chapter devoted to using Mantesh ▶ Taking the plunge to see if you have what it takes to start drawing ▶ Discovering what drawing is▶ Finding the motivation, supplies, and style you need to keep drawing ▶ Developing drawing habits that’ll get you through the rough patches rawing is primal, universal, and deeply personal all at once.

Chapter 1 Gearing Up to Start (And Continue) Drawing In This Chapter

  ▶ Taking the plunge to see if you have what it takes to start drawing ▶ Discovering what drawing is▶ Finding the motivation, supplies, and style you need to keep drawing ▶ Developing drawing habits that’ll get you through the rough patches rawing is primal, universal, and deeply personal all at once. It’s universal and personal because whether you choose to draw a tree or just a looping spiral, by put-ting marks on paper, you connect the inner workings of your mind to the outer world.

Chapter 1: Gearing Up to Start (And Continue) Drawing You probably have a few artistic heroes of your own. Perhaps you’ve made

  (Check out Chapters 2, 6, and 17 for details on how to develop as an artist by usingother artists’ works as inspiration, and refer to Chapter 18 for more details on copyright.) Even as you copy the works and styles of your heroes, don’t forget to embrace your own individuality as an artist, and don’t try to purge the things aboutyour drawings that are different from those of your heroes. No matter what tools you use to draw, the actof drawing is the same: You move your hand/arm/whole body while holding a mark-making tool and leave traces of your movement on your drawing surface.

Chapter 1: Gearing Up to Start (And Continue) Drawing If you ever feel overwhelmed by the seriousness of your drawing endeavors

  As your drawing skills improve, your confidence grows, and greater confidence makes thetougher drawing days easier to manage.✓ The feeling you get from making a mark in response to something you see and knowing that the mark is just right makes all the work you putinto your drawings worth it. Turn to Chapter 4 for some great tips on how to find online communi- ties where you can meet tons of like-minded people to talk to about drawingand art in general.

Chapter 1: Gearing Up to Start (And Continue) Drawing Acquiring essential skills Whatever kind of drawing you want to do, it’ll be much easier to do if you

  Implementing an effective order of operations If you’ve ever spent a long time on one part of a drawing only to realize you made whatever it is you were drawing too big to fit among the other elementsyou still have to add to your drawing to make it complete, you know how frustrating the drawing process can be. By starting each drawing by mapping out the size, basic shape, and placement of all the objects you want to include in that drawing, you can make sure you Part I: Discovering What It Takes to Draw The hardest thing about working from the general to the specific is waiting to get to the fun parts of your drawings (you know, the details that make every- thing look real).

Chapter 2 Gathering What You Need

  to Get StartedIn This Chapter▶ Identifying your aesthetic preferences ▶ Looking for inspiration in others and yourself▶ Creating a space for drawing ▶ Using your sketchbook and choosing your other drawing supplies▶ Getting used to your new drawing supplies with a simple project hen you look at the masterpieces of the art world, you may think that drawing ability is a gift bestowed only on a privileged few, but that’s W simply not true. Part I: Discovering What It Takes to Draw Exploring Your Drawing Preferences Because you’re a unique human being and no one in the world is exactly like you, it’s no surprise that no one in the world draws exactly like you and, more important, that you don’t draw exactly like anyone else.

Chapter 2: Gathering What You Need to Get Started The downside to holding your pencil like you do a pen is that it facili-

  On the other hand, if you hold your pencil in a way that encour- ages larger, looser marks (like the methods we explain in the next twobullet points), you can block in the basic shapes and basic values of your subject, thus allowing you to get a clear sense of the drawing as awhole so that you can then add more specific shapes and values and, lastly, fine details to complete the drawing. © 2003 Brenda Hoddinott Consider the following as you decide which pencil hold to use:✓ How big or small your drawing paper is✓ Whether you are at the beginning or end of a drawing✓ Whether your drawing surface is flat, vertical, or on an angle Making marks with your preferred medium Making marks on a surface is the core of drawing.

1. Use your ruler and a 2B pencil to draw a 4-x-4-inch square in your sketchbook

  Making your drawing space comfy and effective Whether you have your own studio or you have just a corner of a room, your drawing place needs to be free of distractions and full of the furniture andother supplies you need to draw comfortably. No matter where you set up your studio, be sure to include the following ele- ments to make your drawing space as comfy and effective as possible: ✓ Adjustable drawing table: Adjustable drawing tables are designed so you can adjust the height and tilt of your drawing surface for yourdrawing comfort.

Chapter 2: Gathering What You Need to Get Started Using Your Sketchbook Your sketchbook is part journal, part best friend. You can use it as a testing ground for new ideas and as a place for documenting different experiences. Above all, though, your sketchbook is a place where you can recapture the

  If you plan to be out of doors for any length of time, be sure to take sunscreen, a hat, a bottle of water, a coat (if it’s chilly), and anythingelse you may need to make you comfy. To help you get the most out of your on-location drawing sessions, think of sketching people as an exercise to improve your drawing skills rather thanas the means to a complete drawing.

7. Adjust the lightness and darkness of your lines to make them look more realistic

  If you don’t have any ideas to work out in your sketchbook, do the following to help get your creative wheels turning: ✓ Keep a journal in which you make one drawing each day to record something that happened that day; if you have a particularly boring day,make a drawing of something you thought about that day.✓ Keep a journal of weird facts. ✓ Ask your friends to tell you something they learned that day; then use section “The necessities.” Purchase just enough to get started with drawing; then when your skills and budget increase, you can invest in some of the funbut less essential items that we cover in the upcoming section “The wish-list items.” The necessities The following sections describe the basic supplies you need to get started with drawing and to do the projects in this book.

Chapter 2: Gathering What You Need to Get Started If you aren’t familiar with either of these erasers, have a salesperson help you

  Most of the time, a portfolio made from lightweight cardboard gets thejob done, but if you decide to purchase a cardboard portfolio, look for one that’s acid free, or at least ph neutral, to protect your papers and drawingsfrom yellowing. Woodless pencils are especially nice for the continuous tone shading technique because the end is all graphite so you don’t have to stop draw-ing to sharpen them (see Chapter 9 for details on this technique).✓ Special drawing paper: Special drawing papers can add a lot of fun to your projects.

4. Use your HB pencil to outline the other half of the C-shaped space you left in Step 2

  Use your HB pencil to fill in the whole space inside the big circle, except for the highlight (refer to Figure 2-13). Pull and stretch your kneaded eraser until it becomes soft, mold it to a point, and use that point to gently pat the shading on the side of thecircle opposite the highlight (see Figure 2-14).

7. Use your vinyl eraser to clean up any smudges or fingerprints on your drawing paper

Figure 2-13: Creating the eye’shighlight by leaving itthe white of the paper. © 2003 Brenda Hoddinott Part I: Discovering What It Takes to Draw

Chapter 3 Working through the Developmental Stages of Drawing In This Chapter

  ▶ Exploring the five developmental stages of drawing ▶ Walking through a simple project to see how the drawing stages come together“A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” —Ancient Chinese proverb astering the different components of drawing comes with time andpractice. (If you have trouble retraining your eyes, gather up somephotographs and look for the simple shapes of the objects in them; doing so can help you train your eyes to do the kind of seeing you need to do to reducethree-dimensional objects into shapes.) When you draw, begin with a light line drawing of the simple shapes that make up your subject.

Chapter 3: Working through the Developmental Stages of Drawing Some subjects look easy to draw but turn out to be quite difficult. On the

  (See Chapter 7 for in-depth instruction on reducing objects to simple shapes.) Stage 3: Adding a Third Dimension with Volume For many drawing subjects, lines and shapes are all you need to make a com- plete drawing (see the previous sections for details). In the figure, you can see that the utility pole is much more distinct than the cars off in the distanceon the left-hand side of the drawing.

Chapter 3: Working through the Developmental Stages of Drawing

  If you get the shapes of shadows and light in the right places and in the right amounts, your drawings will have the same qualities asreal life and your volumes will be believable. (See Chapters 9 and 10 for everything you need to know about choosing the right shading technique and using it success-fully to render textures.) Figure 3-6 shows you a close-up view of the texture of long, slightly wavy hair.

Chapter 3: Working through the Developmental Stages of Drawing Stage 5: Arranging the Elements: Composition Composition is the balanced and agreeable arrangement of your drawing sub- ject or subjects and the space surrounding them within your drawing format. How you compose your drawing plays a big role in its final impact. When you’re first starting to draw, you may be entirely focused on getting

  Project: Taking Apart a Drawing to See How the Five Stages Work Together In this project, we show you what it looks like to peel away the layers of a drawing one stage at a time so that you can see the separate parts and howthey work together. If you’re doing this project on your own, place a sheet of tracing paper over the photocopy of the original drawing, use your ruler and 2B pencilto trace the border of the drawing, and then use your 2B pencil to trace the accurate shapes of the objects.

Chapter 3: Working through the Developmental Stages of Drawing If you’re doing this project on your own, place a sheet of tracing paper

  over the photocopy of the finished drawing and use your ruler and 2B pencil to trace the border of the drawing. Kensuke Okabayashi All the stages of a drawing work together to become the finished whole.

Chapter 4 Drawing On Your Computer In This Chapter

  ▶ Understanding the benefits of drawing on a computer ▶ Making sure you have the right hardware and software to draw digitally▶ Discovering how to draw digitally and share your work with others ▶ Practicing computer-based drawing with a project o matter what experience you have (or don’t have) with digital draw- ing, if you’re at all curious about drawing on your computer, this chap- N ter is for you. YouTube.com.✓ As long as your computer is connected to a printer, you can create one drawing and print hundreds of copies instantly.✓ You can rewind your artwork several steps to undo any mistakes you make as you draw (by pressing the Undo button), a process that’s bothfaster and easier than using an eraser.✓ You can use input devices, like drawing pens and touch-screen comput- ers, to make computer drawing feel natural and easy.

Chapter 4: Drawing On Your Computer Choosing a new computer for drawing You can use an older or slower computer if you

  Before you buy one, do research on which art programs you want to use, verify thatyou can use them with your computer of choice, and make sure that your computer meets thehardware requirements we cover in the sec- tion “Checking the Hardware You Need to DrawDigitally.”Choosing a good computer for digital drawing is less about the brand and more about what’sinside. After youget a better understanding of what you want to achieve with your digital drawing software and what particular elements you like best, you caninvest in the more powerful and professional options.✓ How-to resources: The more popular art software tends to have more tutorials and similar resources available to help you figure out how touse it.

Chapter 4: Drawing On Your Computer If you have experience building Web sites, creating your online art portfolio

  The techniques you read about and see in action online are not the surefire way to become a good artist and are certainly not the onlyright way for you to draw. In this case, the artist started by drawing the sky and water, then drew the detail of the pier, and finished by adding details and texture to thebeach and foreground.

Chapter 4: Drawing On Your Computer Creating rough sketches Whenever you start a digital drawing (or any drawing, for that matter), your

  (See the instructions that came with your software and/or scanner fordetails on how to import your hard copy drawing into your drawing program.) Figure 4-3: Scanning a hard copysketch into Part I: Discovering What It Takes to Draw As a drawing tool, working in layers is like having a clear sheet of glass or acetate that you place over any stage of your drawing to make additions without changing what you already have. Each layer is devoted to a differentaspect of the drawing, but because the layers are transparent, when they’re all stacked together, the layers blend together to give the impression of onecomplete drawing.

Chapter 4: Drawing On Your Computer To better understand the flexibility and control you gain by using layers in

  For example, you may find out halfway through a drawing that putting acertain element on a different layer makes it difficult to blend or smear colors Part I: Discovering What It Takes to Draw As long as you have an Internet connection and a computer, you can do this project with us; we use the advanced online drawing tools available for free at www.ratemydrawings.com. Using the Airbrush tool and the color panel, select the shades of gray you want to use, and fill in the sky how-ever you want it to look (see Figure 4-7 for an example of a finished sky).

Chapter 4: Drawing On Your Computer 5. Select your Trees layer and draw the trunk and branches of your trees. Use the Pencil tool to draw the trunk and branches of your first tree. After you finish this tree, use the Move tool to click and drag your tree

  When you’re happy with your first tree, continue drawing any other trees or shrubs youwant to include in your landscape. (Figure 4-9 shows an example of a fin- ished Trees layer with three trees.) If you want more flexibility, you candraw each tree on a separate layer so that you can move each one to a different location at any time.

6. Select the Leaves layer and add leaves to your trees

  Use a small brush size with the Pencil tool and set the Scattering quality(see Figure 4-10) to approximately 800% so that you can paint masses of leaves very quickly. (Figure 4-10 shows an example of what your trees may look like after you add leaves to the Leaves layer.) Part I: Discovering What It Takes to Draw Figure 4-10: Giving your trees life by addingleaves to the Leaveslayer.

7. Select the Detail layer of your drawing and add the finishing details to your drawing

  Because the Detail layer lies on top of all the other layers, you can use it to add any final details, like shadows, highlights, and reflections, that siton top of the rest of the drawing. Figure4-11 shows what it looks like to add reflections on the lake to the Detail Chapter 4: Drawing On Your Computer Figure 4-11: The completed drawing.

Chapter 5 A New Kind of Seeing: Getting Familiar with the Artist’s Perspective In This Chapter

  ▶ Understanding the roles of your right and left sides of your brain ▶ Identifying exciting drawing subjects in familiar places▶ Translating your inner vision into art through doodling ▶ Creating a doodle of your own s you may already know, the world looks totally different when you see it through the eyes of an artist. When you adjust your eyes (and brain) toseeing your surroundings in this way, you discover that even the mundane Part I: Discovering What It Takes to Draw you realize some interesting characteristics about yourself.

Chapter 5: Getting Familiar with the Artist’s Perspective Flipping between the left and

  Satisfied that it has grasped the important parts Part I: Discovering What It Takes to Draw The first time you see an illusion like the one in Figure 5-1, you may not even realize there’s another way to look at the image until someone else points it out to you. For example, if you see a birdhouse, you may use your right brain to name it, “Square with a triangle on top.” (This habit comes inhandy in Chapter 7, so go there if you want to get more practice with defining objects by the shapes that make them up.) Part I: Discovering What It Takes to Draw 1.

2. Very lightly draw a dotted line down the center of your rectangle to divide it into two 2-inch squares (or 4-inch squares if you’re using the larger format)

  Make sure the line of symmetry you drew in Step 2 cuts the image of the three lines exactly down the middle and that each half of the image mir-rors the other half. This creativity-inspiring place — where your left brain is quiet and your right brain is in charge — is where you need to be when you draw becauseeverything is easier to draw when you forget about what it is and focus only on what you see.

Chapter 5: Getting Familiar with the Artist’s Perspective

  (See Chapter 17 for more ways to grow as an artist.) Part I: Discovering What It Takes to Draw Seeing your home from awhole new perspective After you draw a few ordinary objects, try focusing your drawings on some- thing a little bigger. By making note of the lines in this scene, the artist found a dynamicsubject for a drawing in a humdrum space she passed through many times during the course of a typical day.

Chapter 5: Getting Familiar with the Artist’s Perspective From the fridge to your drawing paper Food has always been a favorite drawing subject for artists because it’s sym-

  For example, if you make a drawing of corn dogs, the meaning of the drawing comes, in part, from the different associa-tions your viewers make with corn dogs. Figure 5-8: Part I: Discovering What It Takes to Draw Take a moment to appreciate your neighborhood and the landscape that surrounds your home from the eyes of an artist.

Chapter 5: Getting Familiar with the Artist’s Perspective Even when your eyes are open, your memory and imagination are active

  To help you understand how your right-brain and left-brain perceptions impact your drawings, here are a couple of simple exercises for you to try: ✓ Examine the clouds in the sky the next time you go outside. The surrealists, a group of artists committed to the idea that art should plumb the subconscious depths of the artist’s mind, came up with a way of drawingthat is essentially doodling, or making drawing movements with no precon- ceived intent.

Chapter 5: Getting Familiar with the Artist’s Perspective Seeing beyond the lines After you draw your doodle, clear your mind by taking a short break. Then

  Part I: Discovering What It Takes to Draw Part II Developing the Basic Skills ave you ever found yourself in front of an amazing drawing, scratching your head and wondering, “How H did the artist do that?” Well, you’re about to find out! This part introduces you to the basic skills and techniques you need to know to start drawing.

Chapter 6 Planning Your Drawings In This Chapter

  If you’ve ever had a drawing fail because you’ve drawn a beautiful object only to find out you don’t know what to do with the rest of the paper,you’ve come to the right place. (If not, check out Chapter 2 forideas about how to find inspiration.) After you know what you want to draw, Part II: Developing the Basic Skills Focusing on the Elements of Composition To make good compositions, you first need to know what the elements of composition are and how to use them; then you can focus on working them into your drawings for maximum effect.

Chapter 6: Planning Your Drawings After you choose your main point (or points) of interest, you can use many

  In other words, it keeps your eye from going straight to the focal point and getting stuck there.(Check out the upcoming section “Balancing subjects in a composition” to find out how secondary focal points can help balance a drawing.) Part II: Developing the Basic Skills ✓ Use objects within your drawing space to point to your focal point. For example, if your eye path takes the viewer to the right side ofthe drawing, arrange an object or group of objects on that side in a way that makes the eye path turn or curve, angling the eyes of the viewer back into theaction of the drawing.

Chapter 6: Planning Your Drawings Choosing the shape of your drawing space Before you start putting pencil to paper, you

  You could put something like an airplane or hot air balloon in the sky, or you coulduse other objects in the drawing to create an eye path that gets the eye of the moving the two objects apart on the paper. A drawing with three objects on one side of a composition and four on the other is usually much more satisfying orchard, you may think the apple tree closest to you is the most impor- tant subject; therefore, that tree is your focal point.✓ Where should I put my focal point, and how much of my total drawing space should my focal point occupy?

Chapter 6: Planning Your Drawings 2. Use your ruler to divide the rectangle into three equal sections vertically

3. Use your ruler to divide the rectangle into three equal sections horizontally

  Any one of thesepoints makes a great place for a focal point, but the best focal points are the two points on the right because most people read from left to right andthe eye usually enters a drawing from the lower left. When you place a focal point on the right side of your drawing space, you make it easy and naturalfor the viewer to come into the drawing from the lower left and then continue toward the focal point on the right.

1. Use your ruler and 2B pencil to draw a horizontal rectangle on your paper

  Notice that the place where the points intersect is one-third ofthe way up from the bottom of the rectangle and one-third of the way in from the right of the rectangle. For example, if you see a pier you’d like to draw and some boats a small distance from the pier that you wish were in front of thepier, you can use your artistic license to combine the two elements and draw the boats in front of the pier.

Chapter 6: Planning Your Drawings Project: Planning a Composition In this project, we walk you through the process of planning a composition

  We’re looking for a balanced, flowing, and serene alternative.✓ Each photo contains too many focal points, and we want to find a way to eliminate some of the clutter.✓ The broken and abandoned lobster trap in the lower-right corner of Figure 6-17a is a fun and interesting object, and we want to find a way to make it the primary focal point. The end of the section of land (#3) to the left of the building, is shaped like another point of an arrow and is pointing directly toward the fishingshacks on the right side of the composition.

6. When you think the composition looks the way you want it to look

  Use your 2B, 4B, and 6B pencils to add shading to your drawing (see Figure 6-23). The other values, from lights to darks, are on both sides of the drawing, distributing their weights evenly so as to create a bal-ance of values throughout the composition.

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