INCORPORATING THE PRINCIPLES OF CRITICAL DISCOURSE ANALYSIS IN A READING CLASSROOM.

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CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION This chapter is an initial description of the thesis that will review some research-

  It is organized by firstly introducing the background of the research on implementing Critical Discourse Analysisprinciples in a reading classroom. The subsequent part is the discussion of the purposes of the research followed by research questions, significance and scope ofthe research.

1.1. Background

  Scope of the Research The essence of this study is the testing of a considerably more critical approach to teaching reading through principles of Critical Discourse Analysis and whether ornot this implementation has positive results towards the improvement of students’ critical reading. This study is designed by focusing the investigation to the readingactivity based on eight principles of CDA (Fairclough and Wodak, 1997) which are not explicitly taught in the classroom but are drawn into a set of criticalquestions, whose idea is adapted from Cots (2006), as a means to evaluate the texts.

1.6. Organization of the Thesis

  The first chapter is an introduction to the thesis which is started by the background of conducting the research andfollowed by some important notions of the research covering research questions, purposes of the research and scope and significance of the study. The theoriescovered in this section are Critical Discourse Analysis as its principles are applied in the reading subject, Critical Reading as the process as well as the expected goalof the study, and Systemic Functional Linguistics as the analytical tool for observing the text in the textual level.

CHAPTER II I METHODOLOGY This section addresses some methodological elements in conducting the research

  on implementing CDA to the teaching of reading and how this program affects to and was responded by the students. The elements in this chapter consist ofresearch design, site, participants, techniques of data collection and techniques of data analysis.

3.1. Research Design

  This study was also not designed to find any significant result in a form of statistical quantification as it should be in quantitative one, but ratherto find patterns of data, “trying to create a full and rich understanding of the research context (Croker, 2009: 3-4)” as the nature of qualitative investigation. In otherwords, a case study is about boundedness (Hood, 2009: 68) in which cases are limited to a certain degree, both on the object of the study and the scope of theresearcher’s interest (Hood, 2009: 72).

3.2. Site and Participant

  Another reason was based on the feasibility in which, as a faculty member, it was easier for the researcher to reach the site interms of access, permission, as well as initial information regarding the students’ critical capacity. They were one class students out of five classes of the same semester who were selected based on theresearcher’s “personal judgment to select a sample” (Fraenkel & Wallen, 2008: 99) because of their more active participation than students of the other classes.

3.3. Data Collection

  The data in this study were obtained by means of some techniques comprising a phase of teaching, included in it participant observation and students’ reflectivejournals, and questionnaire. The use of these multiple techniques aims to establish validity as the realization of triangulation (Maxwell, 1996).

3.3.1. A Phase of Teaching

  The teaching consisted of two sessions of a preliminary phase, twosessions of explicit teaching (Hancock, 1999) of reading-related features, seven sessions of the teaching of critical reading, and one last session of a progress testand questionnaire distribution. The activities in the preliminary phase comprised the introduction to the teaching program, joint decision of topics for discussion,the distribution of pre-program questionnaire, and the administration of diagnostic test (Hood, 1996; Hughes, 2003).

3.3.1.1. Participant Observation

  Observation involved note taking to record students’ activities as well as the teacher researcher’s questions or stimuli during the interaction and instruction(Allwright, 1988), particularly in the process of discussion on assessing texts by means of CDA’s principles. However, the activities in the first and last sessionswere less observed since the agenda in the first was still on course introduction and the latter on progress test.

3.3.1.2. Students’ Reflective Journal Students were asked to write a journal immediately after the end of each session

  It was also to gain information regarding students’ understanding on the overall process, their feeling, opinion and suggestion for the upcoming sessions aswell as to record their learning process of what they got from the teacher as well as from peers. Thus, the success of the teaching program does not only lie on theresult of the test but also the students’ progress reflected through their journals.

3.3.2. Questionnaire

  First is pre-program questionnaire designed aspreliminary input to indicate the participants’ engagement with reading in general and reading English texts in particular, their understanding on the content of text,their criticality on reading, and their expectation towards the teaching program. Meanwhile, the second is post-program questionnaire containing questions to explore students’ interest on the teaching, their opinion about the need of beingcritical reader including their criticality improvement, their understanding on the nature of text, the term CDA, and their opinion and suggestion for further teachingprogram.

3.4. Data Analysis

  Data analysis were conducted over the course of the study and after the completion of the overall program that were based on each session’s observation,students’ journals, questionnaire, and the result from diagnostic and progress tests. It was scrutinized the teacher’s and students’ activities during the lesson, particularlystudents’ individual engagement in the discussion and their relevant responses to questions.

3.5. Concluding Remarks

  In terms of datacollection, multiple techniques were equipped in order to gain fruitful information for answering the research questions. These include a phase of a teaching coveringclassroom observation and students’ reflective journals, pre and post program questionnaires, and diagnostic and progress tests.

CHAPTER V CONCLUSIONS, LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY, AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FURTHER RESEARCH This final section reports the conclusion and limitation of the study and proposes

  The conclusions and limitations of the study are drawn based on the discussion elaborated in theprevious chapter. Meanwhile, recommendations are proposed based on some limitations in the current study for the betterment of the similar studies in thefuture.

5.1. Conclusions

  The second is the fact that the researchinvolved the researcher as participant observer and the absence of second opinion to assess both students arguments and activities are open to possible subjectiveevaluation of the researcher. Recommendations Based on the limitations of the study drawn above and in order to have better teaching practice in the future, it can be recommended that the presence of co-researcher becomes prominent to assist the researcher to do the observation particularly in the teaching of big class as well as to produce more objective Further researcher can also redesign the instruments to meet the requirements of action research.

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